NYC’s Pulaski Day Parade

This past weekend was the annual celebration of a long-lasting New York City tradition: the Pulaski Day Parade. Founded 80 years ago, the Pulaski Day Parade celebrates General Casimir Pulaski, an American Revolutionary War hero. After meeting Benjamin Franklin in Paris, the Polish general traveled to North America to fight with the Continental Army against the British. Eventually, after distinguishing himself in support of George Washington’s forces on more than one occasion, the Continental Congress gave Pulaski charge of the first American cavalry. Today, New York City’s Pulaski Day Parade celebrates both Pulaski’s contributions to American independence and Polish-American citizens in the New York City metropolitan area.

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Unsurprisingly, then, the parade begins with this float featuring General Pulaski (or his look-alike).

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This year, the parade’s theme was “Polish-American Youth, in Honor of World Youth Day, Krakow, Poland.” And there were plenty of children and teenagers (as well as adults) in the parade, including some dressed in traditional Polish clothing and Polish scouts.

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Parade float celebrating World Youth Day

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There were also a number of Polish and Polish-American veterans organizations in the parade.

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And, like all parades, bystanders also saw numerous NYC police officers and fire fighters and marching bands.

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A few final miscellaneous photos from this year’s Pulaski Day Parade:

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Honoring Pulaski, who died on October 11, 1779 in the Battle of Savannah, the parade is held in early October each year. The parade marches its way up Fifth Avenue from 39th Street to 56th Street.

10 thoughts on “NYC’s Pulaski Day Parade

    1. Sometimes I think that immigrants and their descendants in NYC hold on to some of the traditional things like these costumes more than people do in their own countries – it may be a way to hold on to memories and family connections. I see them at parades and festivals throughout the city regularly, and it definitely makes it fun!

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